PhD, the final frontier – Part two: Reconnaissance

Tools and methods for PhD research and writing After my decision was made to attempt a scholarly career and aim for a PhD (see my first post in this series), I started writing a one page proposal. When I finished I had a working title, a working subtitle, a table of content with 6 chapter titles, and a very general and broad text about some contradictions between the state of technology and the integration of […]

PhD, the final frontier – Part one: To boldly go

My final career? Facing the challenge This is the first in hopefully a series of posts about a new phase in my professional life, in which I will try to pursue a scholarly career with a PhD as my first goal. My intention with this series is to document in detail the steps and activities needed to reach that goal. In this introduction I will describe the circumstances and considerations that finally led to my […]

Meeting people vs. meeting deadlines

Lessons from Cycling for Libraries As I am writing this, more than 100 people working in and for libraries from all over the world are cycling from Amsterdam to Brussels in the Cycling for Libraries 2013 event, defying heat, cold, wind and rain. And other cyclists ;-). Cycling for Libraries is an independent unconference on wheels that aims to promote and defend the role of libraries, mainly public libraries, in and for society. This year […]

Mainframe to mobile

The connection between information technology and library information systems This is the first post in a series of three [1. Mainframe to mobile – 2. Mobile app or mobile web? – 3. Mobile library services] The functions, services and audience of library information systems, as is the case with all information systems, have always been dependent on and determined by the existing level of information technology. Mobile devices are the latest step in this development. […]

ReTweet @Reply – Twitter communities

In my post “Tweeting Libraries” among other things I described my Personal Twitter experience as opposed to Institutional Twitter use. Since then I have discovered some new developments in my own Twitter behaviour and some trends in Twitter at large: individual versus social. There have been some discussions on the web about the pros and cons and the benefits and dangers of social networking tools like Twitter, focusing on “noise” (uninteresting trivial announcements) versus “signal” […]

Replacing our ILS, business as usual

As you may have noticed from some of my tweets, the Library of the Unversity of Amsterdam, my place of work, is in the process of replacing its ILS (Integrated Library System). All in all this project, or better these two projects (one selecting a new ILS, the other one implementing it) will have taken 18 months or more from the decision to go ahead until STP (Switch to Production), planned for August 15 this […]

Developers meet developers, people meet people

Last month I was in the opportunity to participate in the first official Ex Libris “Developers meet developers” meeting in Jerusalem, November 12-13, 2008. The meeting was dedicated to the new Open Platform strategy that Ex Libris has adopted. I already mentioned this development in my post How open are open systems?. Together with one of the other attendees, Mark Dehmlow, of Notre Dame University Library, I wrote a short report on this meeting in […]

Antisocial Networking

In his post “Twitter me this” Owen Stephens writes about differences in use and audience of Social Networking Sites. (Apparently at Imperial College London they had a similar kind of Web2.0 Learning programme as we had at the Library of the University of Amsterdam.) Owen distinguishes audiences on several, intermixed levels (my interpretation): “young” (e.g. MySpace ) vs. “old(er)” (e.g. Facebook ); “business/networking” (e.g. LinkedIn ) vs. “family and friends” (also FaceBook); “professional” (e.g. Ning […]